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Puppy Crate: Humane Training for Your Little Buddy

The world is a big and scary place to your new puppy, crate training can provide him with a quiet place where he feels secure and can get away from the over stimulation of his new life.

 

Puppy Crate

by Rachel Johnson

If you have a new puppy, crate train him!

If you have a new puppy, crate training is something you may want to consider. The world is a big and scary place to your new puppy, crate training can provide him with a quiet place where he feels secure and can get away from the over stimulation of his new life.

·If you just got your puppy, crate training should start right away. Introduce the puppy to the crate as soon as he’s brought home. Placing a variety of treats in the crate during the day will help the puppy enter voluntarily. Food, water, and even toys may also be put into the crate to encourage the puppy to get comfortable.

·So as not to confuse your new puppy, crate training should be accompanied by house training. Choose a location outside for the puppy to eliminate. Take your puppy to the location and when the puppy goes to the bathroom, reward the puppy and even praise him with treats. After some additional play and exercise, put the puppy in the crate with water, toys, and a treat and close the door. Hopefully you have a tired puppy, crate training in this manner will teach the puppy to come to his crate for rest and relaxation.

·After closing the door on the crate, leave the room but remain close enough so that you can hear him. Scratching, clawing, crying, howling, and barking are to be expected when your puppy is first placed in the crate. Never let the puppy out until it is quiet. This will teach your puppy that quiet behavior will be rewarded, not crying. After a nap or a few minutes of quiet, it’s OK to release your puppy. Crate training is confusing so you should reward him with love and affection when he’s released.

·Repeat the crate and release procedure a few more times during the day before it’s bedtime for your puppy. Crate training is learned by gradually increasing the amount of time the dog spends in the crate teach time, and this will make spending the night in the crate as painless as possible. Of course, you should always give the puppy time to exercise and eliminate before placing him in the crate.

·At bedtime, the dog should have been well exercised and then locked in its crate and left for the night. Do not go to the puppy it if cries, you don’t want to reward this behavior. Nighttime may be the most difficult for your puppy, crate training takes some time but eventually he’ll get the idea that he is not being punished, but it’s time for rest.

·Never leave the puppy in its crate for longer than he can control himself, or he may be forced to eliminate in his crate and this can form a bad habit.

·If the puppy must be left for long periods of time, he should be confined to a larger area such as a dog pen, with paper left down for his elimination. As the puppy gets older, it can be left in it’s crate for longer periods of time.

·As a general rule for your puppy, crate training intervals should be kept to short spells so that the puppy will not eliminate in the crate. Although it varies a bit from dog to dog you can assume a two month old puppy can go about three hours in the crate, a three month old puppy about four hours in its crate, and a four month old puppy about five hours in his crate without eliminating.

·It’s important to remember that you are training your puppy, crate training, however, and is not an excuse to ignore your puppy. With crate training comes confidence, individuality, and the ability on the dogs part to remove himself when he is tired, grumpy, or just wants to be alone. Enjoy your puppy, and remember to be patient!

The world is a big and scary place to your new puppy, crate training can provide him with a quiet place where he feels secure and can get away from the over stimulation of his new life.

 

More Articles by Rachel Johnson

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