Control-D to Bookmark
 

Benefit of Vitamin E: What the Science Says

There is significant proof showing the protective benefit of vitamin E among healthy individuals. Vitamin E may safely be considered an effective tool in the prevention of disease, especially when taken as a preventative measure over long periods of time.

 

Benefit of Vitamin E

by Patrick Austin

Is Vitamin E Really a Dangerous Vitamin?

I’m guessing you’ve heard a lot about Vitamin E in the news lately? Not everything you hear is 100% true, and I wanted to take some time to explain the risks and benefit of vitamin E.

Recently, researchers from Johns Hopkins University published a report alleging that taking a high dose of vitamin E for an extended period of time may increase the risk of death. While this may seem straightforward at first, a closer look shows that the conclusions of the study are shaky, at best.

The researchers’ assumptions about vitamin E are severely flawed. They drew conclusions about vitamin E use and death by combining results from nineteen different studies of people already had a major risk of death with existing diseases, including cancer, heart disease, Parkinson’s and kidney failure.

Eighteen of those studies showed no significant difference in death between people who consumed high doses of Vitamin E and those who didn’t.

Only one report found a negative connection and the researchers chose to put an emphasis on that instead of the eighteen reports that showed no problems.

Furthermore, a number of studies in the analysis showed positive results. The researchers even acknowledge this in their final analysis:

“High-dosage trials were often small and were performed in patients with chronic diseases. The generalization of the findings to healthy adults is uncertain. Precise estimation of the threshold at which risk increases is difficult.”

There is significant proof showing the protective benefit of vitamin E among healthy individuals. Vitamin E may safely be considered an effective tool in the prevention of disease, especially when taken as a preventative measure over long periods of time.

A recent study from Tufts University found another benefit of vitamin E - it was beneficial for reducing upper respiratory infections in elderly people.

Even the F.D.A. has acknowledged the potential benefit of vitamin E for cancer related risks:

“Some scientific evidence suggests that consumption of antioxidant vitamins (including vitamin E) may reduce the risk of certain forms of cancer. However, FDA has determined that this evidence is limited and not conclusive.”

While the safety of vitamin E is rock solid, the health risks for too much vitamin E is extremely low. The Institute of Medicine set the intake level for vitamin E at 1,000mg (1,500 IU) per day. This limit is established to represent the maximum intake for a vitamin and/or nutrient that is likely to present no risk of adverse health effects in most healthy individuals in the population. The general recommendation of 400 IU per day to get the benefit of vitamin E for good health falls safely within these limits.

For more information about the benefit of vitamin E, check out these web sites:

 

More Patrick Austin Articles

Join the PulseMed mailing list for news and the latest articles
Email:
We will never ever ever spam or sell your email address. Guaranteed.

 
     
About The PULSE
All information herein provided is for educational use only
.
Copyright 1999-2074, Pulse Media International, Brian Carter, MSci, LAc, Editor